6toplists

The Top 6 TV Series of The 90’S

posted by Nesa

·
The average reading time of
this article is about 05:42

I

f you are addicted to series, you will probably enjoy these older ones as well. Most of us who are born in the 80’s and 90’s watched these series on TV almost every day, which is why this list is somewhat nostalgic as well.

Before you try them, it’s definitely recommended to read our short review. By knowing what to expect from these series, it will be easier to decide which one to start with. So without further ado, let’s investigate together the 6 best TV series in our opinion.


6. Dawson’s Creek

Years: 1998-2003

T

he late 1990s saw a large boom in the teen drama subgenre, of which Dawson’s Creek was certainly one of the prototypical examples. It was very much in the same vein as some of its contemporaries, with a cast of attractive young kids, although it was set apart somewhat by its pretty New England surroundings.

The scripts by series creator Kevin Williamson (read more about him here) caught some early flack before the series had even premiered for their perceived “raciness” and frank discussion of teen sexuality, but time has been kind to memories of the show’s legacy. And James Van Der Beek of course remains a total dreamboat to this day.


5. Beverly Hills, 90210

Years: 1990-2000

B

etween 90210 and its spin-off Melrose Place, the primetime soap opera exploded in a big way in the 1990s. This one was about a family of Minnesota transplants arriving in Beverly Hills and the West Coast culture shock they (especially the kids) receive upon arriving in high school.

Also known as “that show Shannen Doherty was on and then disappeared from,” her departure as one of the principal characters, Brenda, was explained as “moving away to London.”

She was replaced by Tiffani Thiessen, jumping ship from Saved by the Bell to play a girl with quite a lot more attitude than preppy Kelly Kapowski. Of all its actors, you’ve probably seen Ian Ziering most recently as professional shark slayer Fin Shepard, via Sharknado.


4. The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air

Years: 1990-1996

M

ost beloved opening theme song of the 1990s? Could very well be, judging from the response this one will get at literally any bar karaoke night. Seriously, try it the next time you’re out on the town.

Looking at this series in the context of 1990, it’s funny to think that Will Smith was already sort of viewed as a “has-been” in his music career, a guy desperately trying to stay relevant by joining a sitcom.

Of course, he ultimately had the last laugh as the fish-out-of-water story of Fresh Prince became popular immediately and survives in syndication to this day. Smith went on to become Hollywood elite, and the rest of the country learned to dance The Carlton. Everyone wins.


3. Melrose Place

Years: 1992-1999

S

oap operas show up in some capacity in every decade, but the ’90s was when they really went prime time. Spinning off from Beverly Hills 90210 (some folks don’t remember that most of the 90210 characters appear in season one), Melrose Place was originally supposed to be a different kind of a show that would follow all the different characters in an apartment building, with self-contained episodes that would focus on one resident at a time and wrap up by the end of the show.

It could have been an interesting format, but it proved unpopular, and the storylines gradually changed to reflect the more prominent soap operas of its days. Once Heather Locklear’s character Amanda Woodward became a series regular in season two, the show hit its stride and became one of Fox’s mainstays for the rest of the decade.


2. The X-Files

Years: 1993-2002

F

ew series projected a sense of mystery as well as The X-Files, which had fans literally begging for any scrap of information on where its central story was going for most of its run. The flipside is, of course, that it could be frustrating at times, whether it was because of the central story or a weak “monster of the weak” entry.

Individual episodes, though, remain both masterpieces and cultural touchstones of science fiction, whether it’s the disturbing familial story “Home” or the black-and-white Frankenstein narrative “The Post-Modern Prometheus,” both of which prove the show’s range in terms of the stories it chose to tell each week.

No discussion of science fiction or horror on TV in the ’90s can be held without devoting a large chunk to The X-Files. More over, it is continued now.


1. Friends

Years: 1994-2004

I

n terms of pure marketability, Friends was a juggernaut. Everyone watched Friends. Parents watched alongside kids. Its mass appeal is summed up by its incredibly general title alone – I mean really, “Friends”? Its success may be the ultimate reminder that truly populist sitcoms are all about the characters and not necessarily the storylines.

Friends simply had the best-defined characters: Nebbish Ross, prickly Chandler, air-headed Joey, domineering Monica, bubbly Phoebe and “I’m very attractive” Rachel. The writing was just clever enough to let a talented bunch of actors grow into their roles and become archetypes that have been echoed in dozens of sitcoms in the decade since the show’s finale.

The reach of Friends extends to every end of pop culture, even fashion. Case in point: “the Rachel” hairstyle, which became the decade’s defining ’do. That is the definition of influence. Moreover…. in 2017 Friends will be on our TV, it name is Friends Reunion. You are so excited about it, aren’t you?


T

hank you for reading our article about the top 6 series of the 90’s, we hope that we succeeded to nurture nostalgic feelings in you. Do not forget to read our next article, which will be about the top six books of this year.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Nesa (see all articles)

Related Post - You may also like